Harboring fools?

Last week the Hamburg harbor had its annual birthday celebration (for some photos, click here) and as a result there has been much talk of ships, sailing and cargo. In these discussions, a couple of words have stood out for me. The first is the word for tugboat – der Schlepper – because in English we can talk about moving things about by saying that we are “shlepping them.” This happens to be another example of the connection between Yiddish and German which both have the verb schleppen, meaning “to drag.” What I hadn’t realized until working on this post, however, is that there is an additional meaning of “schlepper” beyond the notion of someone who is doing the “schlepping.” Various sources gives the meanings as “fool,” “idiot” and something a bit like “slovenly” or “slacker” as well as “someone who wanders aimlessly” which feels like a distant but perhaps not totally unrelated notion (I see someone being dragged in several directions and as a result never ending up anywhere).

The second is the word die Schifffahrt – and no, your eyes don’t deceive you, in the spelling reform process this word was awarded a third “f” to ensure that its compound status was clear (see this page for a list of new triple letter words) – meaning “shipping” or “navigation,” and, when you are at a scenic location  like the Hamburg harbor, “boat trip.”

The third is the German word for “steamship” or “steamboat” – der Dampfer. This is a partial cognate as one of its other meanings is “damper” in the sense of the muting action on piano strings or in the figurative sense of “putting a damper on someone’s spirits.” But the image in my mind that helps me remember this word in its nautical sense relies on the relationship between der Dampfer and “damp” (which is actually translated either as feucht or klamm): I see a ship that is damp not solely from being afloat, but also from the condensation of the steam that is powering it.

Quite fabulously, according to the Guardian, the Guinness Book of World Records gives a combination of der Dampfer and die Schifffahrt together with a just few other words as the longest in German:
die Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft – “the association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services” – which although likely apocryphal didn’t bring up any of that red underlining WordPress uses to warn you of a misspelling!

I was also intrigued to find that der Dampfer appears in the idiom auf dem falschen Dampfer sein/sitzen – “to be barking up the wrong tree” or “to have gotten the wrong end of the stick” – something of which I’ve had no shortage of opportunities to do as I work on learning German!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 thoughts on “Harboring fools?

  1. kwhirsh says:

    Apparently the longest word in German is now obsolete: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22762040 Be sure that you listen to the bit of audio, it is superb as you get to hear both this long German word and a long Welsh word as a bonus!

  2. kwhirsh says:

    And here’s another piece on German compound words that includes a reputed name for them die Bandwurmwörter – “tapeworm words.”
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/10095976/Germany-drops-its-longest-word-Rindfleischeti….html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

a free state of mind

Thoughts from the Journey...

The Diversity Dividend

Doing Diversity Differently

Lirean

Smart language learning

Akademie für geile Texte

Literaturnobelp-Reis, Basmati, 3min

Idol Musings

Ray's ruminations, rants and reflections on his American Idol addiction

PAUL'S EFL REVIEW

Taking a Fresh Look at the English Language

Marathon Sprachen

Unravelling the complexities of German in English

The Elementalist Epoch

Stories and Poems from the mind of Tristan Nagler

Reality Swipe

Welcome to the Reality Swipe experience... Brace yourself

%d bloggers like this: